Category: FAQ’s


What is an AMF panel?

Automatic mains failure (AMF) panels, often referred to as automatic transfer switch (ATS) panels, make the power switch to emergency standby generators in the event of a significant loss of mains power or total blackout. Without AMF panels, generators need to be operated manually and that can mean lost data, potential damage to electrical equipment, and huge amounts of disruption. Read more »

What is CHP?

Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is the simultaneous production of heat and electricity from a single fuel source, usually at the point of use.

With a CHP system a fuel (usually natural gas) is used to drive a reciprocating engine, delivering electricity from the alternator. At the same time the heat produced by the engine working, is captured from various sources (for example from the exhaust system and engine cooling circuits) to produce hot water. On some models heat is also recovered from the alternator and engine oil, further increasing efficiency.
Typically a CHP will produce up to twice the amount of heat energy as the electricity it generates. Read more »

Why Is disaster recovery planning so Important?

According to AXA Insurance, 80% of businesses affected by a major incident, either never re-open, or close within 18 months.

Having a robust disaster recovery and business continuity plan, minimises this impact on the business and ultimately, the customer. Therefore, not only is disaster recovery planning important for you, it is important for your customers. Read more »

Power terminology glossary

There are many terms that we come across every day in the power industry. Some are acronyms and others are industry terms. For the obvious to the ambiguous here are our thoughts.

This will be a post that we’ll update every time we think of any others. And if there is anything you’d like us to add just get in touch… Read more »

What is G59?

G59 Embedded Generator Regulations

G59 is the regulation surrounding the connection of any form of generator device to run ‘in parallel’ or ‘synchronised’ with the mains electrical utility grid (National Grid).  The regulation has its roots in Ofgem rules, and is administered as the Energy Networks Association Engineering Recommendation G59/2-1 “Recommendations for the connection of generating plant to the Distribution System of Licensed Distribution Network Operators – Amendment 1”.

This is relevant for all power generation, including combined heat and power units as well as generators being used for peak-lopping, or grid parallel use, greater than 16A per phase.  For anything below this the Engineering recommendation G83/1-1 applies. Read more »

CHP – frequently asked questions

Will CHP Work For Me?

3 things are important, and they are all interlinked.

  1. The ability to use the heat, for heating or hot water, most of the year round. For example, an 80 bedroom hotel with a swimming pool would likely be a very successful application; whereas a 10 bedroom guest house would probably not be. Many other successful applications exist in all sorts of industries. Please ask us.  Read more »

Generators – frequently asked questions

These questions are often asked by customers looking to protect their power supply.  The answers given are not intended to be highly scientific but a useful rule of thumb and we hope you’ll take them in the spirit intended. If you want to be sure you’ve got it right, ask for a free site survey from one of the shentongroup team – that way you can be safe, not sorry. Remember the answers given may apply only to a shentongroup solution. Not all Generators perform like a Powerhouse®.

Read more »

What is combined heat & electrical power?

The concept of cogeneration is all about combined heat and electrical power (CHP).  Unlike a classic power station, where heat produced when making electricity, is wasted into the environment – CHP units collect all this waste heat and use it for something.  This saves fuel which would otherwise need to be used in boilers for producing that heat. Read more »